How exercising affects your mental health

Staff Editor Lola Smith shares her opinion on how exercising and having a routine is beneficial for your mental health. Smith says, The impacts of exercising are exceptional, and as a high school student, I think having a routine could change lives drastically as it has done for me.

Ioanna Tsompanellis

Staff Editor Lola Smith shares her opinion on how exercising and having a routine is beneficial for your mental health. Smith says, “The impacts of exercising are exceptional, and as a high school student, I think having a routine could change lives drastically as it has done for me.”

Lola Smith, Staff Editor

It goes without saying that exercising has a direct impact on your physical and even your mental health.

According to ScienceDaily, “A study of 1.2 million people in the USA has found that people who exercise report having 1.5 fewer days of poor mental health a month, compared to people who do not exercise.”

Even though it can be addicting, exercising can also meld into a toxic game of compare and contrast. There’s that excessive need to be skinny or look the best which is the source of making the gym a place full of toxicity. 

Nevertheless, working out shouldn’t be a competition to have the greatest physique. It should be to feel better, to have a healthy body and way of thinking.  

There is a preconceived notion of thinking that exercising is a chore rather than an enjoyable privilege. Many of us students are stuck in sedentary classes; however, we should implement a mindset of wanting to get outside. The implementation of a healthy routine is critical to an improved mindset, for the benefits of this act far outweigh the temporary satisfaction of lounging on your couch for hours on end.  

According to Jamison Monroe from U.S News, “In a small study of a dozen young adults at the University of Newcastle in Australia, participants with major depressive disorder exercised regularly; after 12 weeks of exercise, 10 of the participants were no longer categorized as depressed.” 

Personally, I try to get to the gym five times a week. I go every day at around the same time, and now it’s a natural instinct to want to work out. On weekends I’ll go for walks and or runs to be outside, enjoying the occasional warm weather. 

Due to attaining this mindset fostered by physical fitness, I encourage you to find a balance that is specific and beneficial to you. By doing so, you can have your harder workouts and your leisurely walks all while enjoying the time you spend with yourself. This motivation coupled with a healthy balance has completely changed my way of thinking and my day-to-day life. 

In addition to these various benefits, I have found that having an established routine pushes me through the hard times that the teenage years often possess. 

Believe it or not, going to school and learning every day can run someone ragged. Especially as a junior experiencing the pure rigor that high school has to offer, I often find myself mentally and physically drained by the time I come home from school. 

After conforming to this active lifestyle, I became much more content with my daily activities. The impacts of exercising are exceptional, and as a high school student, I think having a routine could change lives drastically as it has done for me.